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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
it to light was found dead in his home. rebecca brooks was arrested this weekend after resigning as ceo of news corp. she is expected to testify tomorrow. this is not her first time appearing before parliament, the clip i'm showing you is from 2003. watch closely. brooks testifying with andy coulson. coulson went on to become david cameron's spokesman and has since resigned and has been arrested in the scandal. >> can i ask, the one element if you ever pay the bliss for information? >> we have paid police for information in the past, and it's been -- >> will you do it in the put? >> it depends on -- >> within the code and within the law, there is a clear public interest and the same holds for private detectives, subterfuge. >> it's illegal for police officers to receive payments. >> no, no, no. i just said within the law. >> this is not only the beginning of the scandal. it's the beginning of the news corporation's attempts at damage control. coulson stepping in to blunt brooks' answers. i spoke with the other british whistleblower about the death of sean hoare and about the spread of a
-news international chief rebekah brooks will prepare to face british legislators. >>> two giants of tech as ibm powers ahead but cisco loses its way. >>> and banks lead the losses as debt ditherring continues to drag the world stock markets. >>> rupert murdoch's power and influence will be put to the test later today. he and also his son, james, will be facing uk legislators in just a few hours from now. they'll also be alongside rebekah brooks, former editor of the "news of the world." it's expected to be a harsh grilling for the three individuals over what they knew about alleged phone hacking at the london tabloid "news of the world." those allegations have done quite as much to damage rupert murdoch's reputation as they've done to "news of the world's" stock. it's been plummeting. >> the company's become the target of a hack attack itself. lulzsec is claiming a hack attack with a fake story about murdoch being found dead in his garden. in a tragic turn one of the first journalists to expose hacking at "news of the world" was found dead on monday. sean hull was former "news of the world" emp
to wolf blitzer. "situation room" starts right now. >> thanks very much, brook. >>> two weeks before the united states may plunge into financial crisis. plu, media mogul rupert murdoch is just hours away from being grilled and lambasteds by british law makers and now a whistleblower in the growing phone hackl scandal reportedly is dead. and a 77-year-old man defends his home and family from an intruder with a gun. stand by for the dramatic story. that's even more compelling because -- get this -- he's a member of the united states congress. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> the u.s. defaulting on its debt for the first time in history? we can't state it enough, this has enormous consequences for all of us, and time is quickly running out to prevent what the president calls armageddon. let's check in with kate baldwin. she's standing by with the latest. where do the negotiations stand right now? >> the two top republicans in the house. no official readout from the white house, but president obama says we are making progress when asked today by reporters how the deb
murdoch, james murdoch and rebekah brooks on how much they knew about these phone hacking allegations and when did they know it and why didn't they put a stop to it sooner or be more forthcoming. they told lawmakers earlier it was one rogue reporter, an isolated incident and it didn't did any further than that. we know of course that it turns out that thousands of people may have had phone mail messages hacked and lawmakers want to get to the bottom of how much each of them knew. >> the other question is this whistle-blower found dead yesterday tragically. police are looking into that. what is the latest there? >> reporter: what we know is that basically police have confirmed that a man was found dead at his apartment. that man is believed to be the whistle-blower for news of the world. he confirmed that the editor of the paper not only knew about the phone hacking but actively encouraged it from his reporters. he was the only whistle-blower to really go public and confirm that this was the case. now, what we understand from police is that he was found dead at his apartment while his
and small question. would you agree, ms. brooks, that part of the public concern here is about the closeness of the police and now politicians to "news of the world" and "news international?" >> i think that the public's concern overwhelmingly is the on the interception of voice mails is the idea that anybody could intercept the voice mails of victims of crime, and i think that is the overwhelming concern. >> but there has been a lot of concern voiced over the closeness of the police and the politicians and the "news of the world" and "news international" wouldn't you agree as a matter of fact? >> well, i have seen that "news of the world" has been singled out for that closeness so if you are going to address this and you know this more than anyone on the committee, because of your career as a journalist that it is wholly unfair in the discussing the closeness of police and politicians with the media to single out the "news of the world." >> well, it is a fact, and this has been a criticism and yet, you are on your watch as chief executive of "news international" have a triple whammy, becaus
. and that's starting in half-hour. then rebekah brooks who used to run murdoch's british newspaper empire until last week will answer questions. a limited number of the public are being allowed in. people were lined up at 7:00 a.m. and the line stretched around the block trying to get a seat. the police are still also under allegation of corruption. this story has so many 10 kals, many threads of inquiry even as it involves police involvement. a news of the word reporter was found dead in his home yesterday. sean was the man who originally blew the whistle on his knowledge -- his allegation that former editor of the world andy coulson was very aware of phone hacking and encouraged it. that allegation is something coulson has denied. bill there are when the testimony from mr. murdoch and his son james get underway we'll take you to that room in london, england. jamie: we are just getting word that the fbi is searching homes of the suspected hacker group anonymous. the target said to be in their late teens to early 20s. we are told the hacking group inspired by wikileaks has defaced web sit
including rebekah brooks and james murdock on 26 separate locations. my question is whether he can assure the house that the bid was not raised at any of those meetings. was there at any time he discussed the bid with officials of the culture? >> 10 days ago, the prime minister said i was not given any specific information that would lead you to change my mind. it would have made every effort to uncover the information. they made every effort for the facts. did would surely have led him to change his mind about mr. coulson. all would decline. he was accused of making payments to police. the prime minister did nothing with the information. in may of 2010, he warned the prime minister of bringing him into downing street. he did nothing. on september the fourth 2010, the new york times published an investigation " in most civil -- quoting multiple sources. we know that article is not enough to open their increase. we know it triggers the termination of the metropolitan police. that led to the author. he said it is right that it does not taken up. the question is why. the prime minister was c
of the world" and "the sun" was a part of it. >> thank you. >> miss brooks, rupert murdoch in his evidence session said quite clearly that the responsibility for the closure of "news of the world" lay fairly and squarely with senior management of that paper, which i assume that includes you. is that the case? >> i think -- i think i may have missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said it exactly how it was, that it was a collective decision. we all talked together. mr. murdoch was abroad at the time at a conference. we all talked together -- >> is that mr. murdoch senior? >> sorry, yes, rupert murdoch. yes. >> you wanted to say something else? >> no. sorry. >> when you were advising your staff that the paper was closing, during the private session, i think you said something like there was more to come. would you like to expand on what you meant by that? >> when i went down to the newsroom, to explain the decision, clearly and quite rightly, the journalists on the "news of the world" who very honorable journalists who have been putting out a newspaper under the scrutiny for
am aware of that mr. brooks or mr. heaton had knowledge of. certainly her knowledge of those things has not been clear. i have seen no evidence of impropriety. >> [unintelligible] is that right? >> yes. >> in october of 2010, did you still believe it when you said you would vigorously pursue the truth? >> yes. >> if you were not worrying bend? >> i do not know. >> you acknowledge they you were misled? >> yes. >> are you aware that in march [unintelligible] police? >> i was not aware at the time. it had been amended. >> if you were anyone else in the organization? investigating it at the time? explaining why? >> let me say something. this is not an excuse. this is less than 1% of the company. distinguished people and professionals. >> [unintelligible] what i am trying to establish is paca how your wrongdoing was -- establish is how your wrongdoing was established at the time. were you made aware of [unintelligible] >> [unintelligible] >> what did they do, subsequent to the arrest? >> i told the investigators and eventually they investigated further. >> what did you do to investigate
. the sound heard more often was silence. >> were you -- about your son or rebekah brooks? >> that took 10 seconds to answer. he hesitated on every question of detail. >> i forget but i expect that i have been in daily contact with both of them. >> news international was run day today by james murdoch. today, he blamed the police, complaints commission, and a failed inquiry for the failure to reveal what had gone wrong. >> if i knew then what i know now and with the benefit of hindsight, we would have taken more action are around that and we would have been quicker to get to the bottom of the allegations. >> out different -- how different today was then the days when he was feted by prime ministers. david cameron was never photographed with mr. murdoch even though he was invited discretely just days after the last election. >> why did you go in the back? >> to avoid photographers. i did as i was told. >> he was looking relaxed, then may ham. the drama turned into a circus. >> he was there in that room. what can you tell us? >> i was sitting a few feet away and only just half a second befor
of the world." >> thank you. >> miss brooks, rupert murdoch in his evidence session said the responsibility for the closure of "news of the world" laid fairly and square leon the management of the newspaper, which would include you. is that the case? >> i think i may have missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said is exactly how it was. it was a collective decision. we all talked together, and mr. murdoch was in with the board at the time, >> yes, rupert murdoch, yes. >> during the private session i think you said something like there was more to come. would you like to expand what you meant by that? >> when i went down to the newsroom to explain the decision, and clearly and quite rightly the journalists on the "news of the world" who are very honorable and journalists who will been putting out a newspaper under the scrutiny for a longtime and with great pride in their newspaper were very sad and baffled by management's decision to close the paper. what i was saying to them is that right now you may not be able to right at this moment understand why we've done it, but i thi
was a part of it. >> thank you. >> jim sheridan. >> miss brooks. rupert murdoch in his evidence session said quitely that the responsibility for the closure of news of the world fell fairly and swearly on senior management which i assume would include you, is that the case? >> i think i missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said it exactly how it was. that it was a collective decision. we all talked together. mr. murdoch was abroad at the time at a conference. we all talked together. >> murdoch senior? >> yes, rupert murdoch. >> you were going to say something snels. >> no. >> when you were advising your staff the paper was closing during the private session. i think you said something like there was more to come. youl you like to expand? >> when i went down to the newsroom to explain the decision, clearly and and quite rightly the journalists on the news of the world who very honorable journalists who have been putting out the newspaper under the scrutiny for a long time and with great exclusives and great pride in their newspaper were very sad and baffled by management's de
former bosses, rebekah brooks, andy coulson who are arrested, not criminal masterminds but engaged in a media empire where criminality was rif, if that media empire got david cameron elected as the british prime minister, that's a good story. >> i have a break coming up. since you mentioned rebekah brooks and andy coulson, both former editors of "news of the world," do you have any doubt that they knew phone hacking was going on at that paperer? >> i have no doubt whatsoever. piers morgan was also my editor, but in that time in 1994-'5, it wasn't illegal. you could sit outside someone's house and tap into their phone conversations and record all of it. and also look at their messages. i need to ask a lawyer actually, is it legal for a wife to hack into her husband's phone if she thinks he's cheating? about 10% of the population of britain have done that, too sgle well ooh keep our focus on journalists. paul mcmull land, good luck with the pub. >> thanks. >>> coming up on the second part of "reliable sources," debt talks collapse after news reports of a deal. how much of the press i
than 100"÷"÷ million homes."÷"÷ created by cable, provided as a÷ public service."÷"÷ >>> rebecca brooks, the former"÷ chief executive of news"÷"÷ international, testified earlie÷ this week before a house of"÷"÷ commons committee. she"÷"÷ was questioned on her knowledge of phone hacking at"÷÷ "news of the world," alleged"÷"÷ payments made to police officers and to celebrity victims of"÷"÷ hacking. she was"÷"÷ also asked about"÷"÷ tampering with the voicemail of a teenage murder victim. >> we've now come to the second part of our session. i'd like to welcome ms. be rebecca brooks, recent chief executive officer at news international, and i'd like to thank you for your willingness to come before the committee. we are very much aware there is an ongoing police investigation which could lead to further proceedings, and we will bear that in mind, but we also appreciate your statement when you resigned from the company that you wanted to be as helpful as possible to various inquiries that are underway. could i just start then. news international issued a statement when you we
his son and rebekah brooks all apologizing for "the news of the world"'s behavior. >> this is the most humble day of my career. the same story is not enough. things must be put right. no excuses. . it's a matter of great regret of mine, my father's and everyone at news corporation, and these are standards, these actions do not live up to the standards that our company aspires to. it's our determination to both put things right. make sure these things don't happen again. >> i would like to add my own personal appaologies and the apologies that james and rupert murdoch made today. clearly, what happened at "the news of the world" and certainly the allegations of voice intercepts, is pretty horrific and abhorrent. >> as i said, robert, it's an apology without a confession. what does that mean? >> we've seen it in the states here so many times, mistake was made. we know exactly the way that the grammar that's used. here we have somewhat of an about the je object but no specificity to an apology. i didn't hear one. >> this is a multilevel scandal. this doesn't just involve news corporation.
murdoch, his son james, and reb ekah brooks. bbc newsnight tell us tell they are covering the story. >> tonight, robert mcdowell on the fcc's action to begin cracking down on unauthorized service charges to cell phone bills. that is tonight on "de communicators -- "the communicators." the nuclear regulatory agency officially make recommendations within 90 days. the industry would have five years for any new regulations to come from the process. >> we are honored to be here today, speaking at this venerable institution. the national press club is a venue like no other. it has been at the center of washington news. as i was preparing for this, in my staff did a little investigation, they understood the historic emblem was that of an owl. i will not claim wisdom and i will let you judge my awareness, but i can relate to the long nights spent sleepless on the job. as chairman of the new tillage -- the nuclear regulatory commission, one of the best aspects of my job is having the opportunity to lead a staff of nearly 4000 talented public servants. we hear from all sides and all perspecti
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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